In the literature: September highlights

Click here to read some interesting recently published papers from our community. If you have published an article in the field of in silico medicine, send it to us: we will include it in this section of the newsletter!

IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics: "Toward a Regulatory Pathway for the Use of in Silico Trials in The Ce Marking of Medical Devices"

Pappalardo et al

Abstract

In Silico Trials methodologies will play a growing and fundamental role in the development and de-risking of new medical devices in the future. While the regulatory pathway for Digital Patient and Personal Health Forecasting solutions is clear, it is more complex for In Silico Trials solutions, and therefore deserves a deeper analysis. In this position paper, we investigate the current state of the art towards the regulatory system for in silico trials applied to medical devices while exploring the European regulatory system toward this topic. We suggest that the European regulatory system should start a process of innovation: in principle to limit distorted quality by different internal processes within notified bodies, hence avoiding that the more innovative and competitive companies focus their attention on the needs of other large markets, like the USA, where the use of such radical innovations is already rapidly developing.

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Biophysical Journal: "Computational investigation of the dynamic control of cAMP signaling by PDE4 isoform types"

Paes Dean et al

Abstract

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a generic signaling molecule that, through precise control of its signaling dynamics, exerts distinct cellular effects. Consequently, aberrant cAMP signaling can have detrimental effects. Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) enzymes profoundly control cAMP signaling and comprise different isoform types wherein enzymatic activity is modulated by differential feedback mechanisms. Because these feedback dynamics are non-linear and occur coincidentally, their effects are difficult to examine experimentally but can be well simulated computationally. Through understanding the role of PDE4 isoform types in regulating cAMP signaling, PDE4-targeted therapeutic strategies can be better specified. Here, we established a computational model to study how feedback mechanisms on different PDE4 isoform types lead to dynamic, isoform-specific control of cAMP signaling. Ordinary differential equations describing cAMP dynamics were implemented in the VirtualCell environment. Simulations indicated that long PDE4 isoforms exert the most profound control on oscillatory cAMP signaling, as opposed to the PDE4-mediated control of single cAMP input pulses. Moreover, elevating cAMP levels or decreasing PDE4 levels revealed different effects on downstream signaling. Together these results underline that cAMP signaling is distinctly regulated by different PDE4 isoform types and that this isoform specificity should be considered in both computational and experimental follow-up studies to better define PDE4 enzymes as therapeutic targets in diseases in which cAMP signaling is aberrant.

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PLos One: "Experimental validation of a subject-specific finite element model of lumbar spine segment using digital image correlation"

Garavelli Chiara et al

Abstract

Pathologies such as cancer metastasis and osteoporosis strongly affect the mechanical properties of the vertebral bone and increase the risk of fragility fractures. The prediction of the fracture risk with a patient-specific model, directly generated from the diagnostic images of the patient, could help the clinician in the choice of the correct therapy to follow. But before such models can be used to support any clinical decision, their credibility must be demonstrated through verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification. In this study we describe a procedure for the generation of such patient-specific finite element models and present a first validation of the kinematics of the spine segment. Quantitative computed tomography images of a cadaveric lumbar spine segment presenting vertebral metastatic lesions were used to generate the model. The applied boundary conditions replicated a specific experimental test where the spine segment was loaded in compression-flexion. Model predictions in terms of vertebral surface displacements were compared against the full-field experimental displacements measured with Digital Image Correlation. A good agreement was obtained from the local comparison between experimental data and simulation results (R2 > 0.9 and RMSE% <8%). In conclusion, this work demonstrates the possibility to apply the developed modelling pipeline to predict the displacement field of human spine segment under physiological loading conditions, which is a first fundamental step in the credibility assessment of these clinical decision-support technology.

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Nature: "Live-seq enables temporal transcriptomic recording of single cells"

Chen Wanze et all

Abstract

Single-cell transcriptomics (scRNA-seq) has greatly advanced our ability to characterize cellular heterogeneity1. However, scRNA-seq requires lysing cells, which impedes further molecular or functional analyses on the same cells. Here, we established Live-seq, a single-cell transcriptome profiling approach that preserves cell viability during RNA extraction using fluidic force microscopy, thus allowing to couple a cell’s ground-state transcriptome to its downstream molecular or phenotypic behaviour. To benchmark Live-seq, we used cell growth, functional responses and whole-cell transcriptome read-outs to demonstrate that Live-seq can accurately stratify diverse cell types and states without inducing major cellular perturbations. As a proof of concept, we show that Live-seq can be used to directly map a cell’s trajectory by sequentially profiling the transcriptomes of individual macrophages before and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, and of adipose stromal cells pre- and post-differentiation. In addition, we demonstrate that Live-seq can function as a transcriptomic recorder by preregistering the transcriptomes of individual macrophages that were subsequently monitored by time-lapse imaging after LPS exposure. This enabled the unsupervised, genome-wide ranking of genes on the basis of their ability to affect macrophage LPS response heterogeneity, revealing basal Nfkbia expression level and cell cycle state as important phenotypic determinants, which we experimentally validated. Thus, Live-seq can address a broad range of biological questions by transforming scRNA-seq from an end-point to a temporal analysis approach.

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Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology: "Immuno-Modulatory Effects of Intervertebral Disc Cells"

Bermudez-Lekerika Paola et al

Abstract

Low back pain is a highly prevalent, chronic, and costly medical condition predominantly triggered by intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). IDD is often caused by structural and biochemical changes in intervertebral discs (IVD) that prompt a pathologic shift from an anabolic to catabolic state, affecting extracellular matrix (ECM) production, enzyme generation, cytokine and chemokine production, neurotrophic and angiogenic factor production. The IVD is an immune-privileged organ. However, during degeneration immune cells and inflammatory factors can infiltrate through defects in the cartilage endplate and annulus fibrosus fissures, further accelerating the catabolic environment. Remarkably, though, catabolic ECM disruption also occurs in the absence of immune cell infiltration, largely due to native disc cell production of catabolic enzymes and cytokines. An unbalanced metabolism could be induced by many different factors, including a harsh microenvironment, biomechanical cues, genetics, and infection. The complex, multifactorial nature of IDD brings the challenge of identifying key factors which initiate the degenerative cascade, eventually leading to back pain. These factors are often investigated through methods including animal models, 3D cell culture, bioreactors, and computational models. However, the crosstalk between the IVD, immune system, and shifted metabolism is frequently misconstrued, often with the assumption that the presence of cytokines and chemokines is synonymous to inflammation or an immune response, which is not true for the intact disc. Therefore, this review will tackle immunomodulatory and IVD cell roles in IDD, clarifying the differences between cellular involvements and implications for therapeutic development and assessing models used to explore inflammatory or catabolic IVD environments.

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Date: 22/09/2022 | Tag: | News: 1357 of 1368
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